Immersion Check-In

We’re immersed in Immersion as we measure student engagement.

Whenever an Expanse student participates in Community, Socratic or STEM, there’s a Scosche device on their arm. For that matter, there are Scosches on the arms of the Expanse staff as well. As reported here a few weeks ago, we’re immersed in Immersion Neuro, part of an effort to measure student engagement. So far, so good!

A few days ago, we caught up with Laura Beavin-Yates, who gets her own Immersion scores from her Apple watch. Laura serves as Immersion’s SVP of Customer Success, providing clients across industries with guidance, analysis and actionable insights. She is thrilled to work with founder Paul Zak, who was her doctoral adviser at Claremont Graduate. (Aside from her Immersion duties, Laura is also an adjunct professor of research methods at Mount St. Mary’s.) According to Laura, Immersion employees feel like family, “quick to get excited and see all applications that are possible. We’re trying to break the model – make something accessible and that everyone can use.”

Expanse isn’t the first educational institution checking out Immersion Neuro. Laura recalls trying it out with a high school health class, noting that an otherwise quiet student proved to be the most immersed in the material: “What we see on the surface [isn’t necessarily what is] happening internally.” Outside of education, professionals are working with immersion, including consulting giant Accenture. (Laura notes that like many Expanse professionals, the consultants forget that their devices are on!)

“Immersion validates our real-world experience – that our students are engaged, that they love being together, that they love the conversations they’re having. While we don’t reduce student health and happiness to a number, we’re thrilled to have a metric that suggests how much the kids are engaged with the experiences we’re creating for them.”

Expanse COO Robert Malka has been “tracking” the progress of the pilot. He notes, “Immersion validates our real-world experience – that our students are engaged, that they love being together, that they love the conversations they’re having. While we don’t reduce student health and happiness to a number, we’re thrilled to have a metric that suggests how much the kids are engaged with the experiences we’re creating for them.”

Any of us “immersed” in a world of social media are bombarded with online questionnaires and requests to follow pages. “We really try to push away from surveys,” she comments. “‘Like’ is such a weird word.”

Leave a Reply